Siamese Cat Growth: Explained Super Simple


More Meows is an Amazon Associate. As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases. We may also earn commissions if you purchase products from other retailers after clicking on a link from our site.

If you are new to having a Siamese cat, you may be interested or even perplexed by your cat’s development.

The Siamese cat grows slowly. It will reach sexual maturity at six months of age but will not reach its full height and weight until it is one year old. Siamese cats live long lives between 15 to 20 years.

Do you wonder how large your Siamese kitten might grow, or when your kitten will get its color points? Here we will examine how the Siamese cat grows physically and mentally from birth to old age.

Siamese Cat

If you are wondering what the best products are for your cat, check out this article that will break down all my recommendations for you: Things To Buy For A Cat Right Now!

Siamese Kitten Growth: Birth to 6 Months

The first six months of your kitten’s life will be filled with the most physical growth. During these crucial months, your Siamese kitten requires close monitoring of its weight gain and positive reinforcement of acceptable behaviors. His personality will develop quickly, making him unique to his littermates.

Siamese Kittens at Birth

At birth, the Siamese kittens will be completely white or cream in color. The markings will begin to appear after the first week or so. The Siamese kitten is completely white due to a mutation of the tyrosinase gene that causes partial albinism that inhibits coloration in body temperature above 98 degrees.

The kitten’s eyes will be sealed, and its ears will be folded for the next two weeks. During this time, the kitten is completely reliant upon its mother for:

  • Warmth
  • Food
  • Care

Your Siamese kitten will weigh around 3 ounces and measure about 3 inches long. But, it will rapidly grow and should gain one fourth to one half an ounce per day until it is weaned.

A Siamese Kitten’s 1st Three Months of Life

By the time your Siamese kitten is a month old, it should weigh around a pound. The coloration points will continue to darken.

Siamese Cat Growth Chart: First 3 Months

Siamese Cat Growth Chart: First 3 Months of Life 
MilestoneTime Period
Siamese Kitten Eyes and Ears Open2 to 3 Weeks
Siamese Kitten Teeth Come In2 Weeks
Siamese Kitten Starts Exploring / Kitten Proof Your Home4 Weeks
Siamese Kitten Starts Eating Solid Food4 to 5 Weeks
Siamese Kitten Learns to Use Litter Box4 to 5 Weeks
New Owners Get to Meet Kittens at Most Breeders4 to 6 Weeks
If Buying a Siamese Kitten, Kitten Proof Your Home4 to 6 Weeks
Siamese Kitten Goes Home to Forever Home6 to 14 Weeks
Siamese Kitten Markings are Well Pronounced8 Weeks
Siamese Kitten to Visit Veterinarian for Immunizations8 to 13 Weeks
Siamese Kitten is Playful and Gains Confidence in AbilitiesFirst 3 Months
Siamese Kitten Becomes More VocalFirst 3 Months
Siamese Cat Growth Chart: First 3 Months of Life

To learn more about Siamese cat vocalization, which starts in the first three months of life, check out our article on why Siamese cats meow so much: Click Here.

Kitten Proofing for Siamese Kittens

During the first couple of months, you will need to kitten proof your home to ensure the safety of your kitten and your things.  She will be curious and will put things in her mouth. Your Siamese kitten may start climbing on the furniture.  She will also play in areas that could be dangerous.

To learn more about whether cats should be allowed on furniture, check out our article: Click Here.

Siamese Cat

The First Vet Visits for Siamese Kittens

At 8 to 13 weeks, your kitten is ready to visit the veterinarian. The doctor will examine your kitten to ensure she is healthy and ask you questions about her diet and home life. There are a few hereditary problems your veterinarian will look for, such as:

  • Eye Squints
  • Tail Kinks
  • Intestinal Tumors
  • Asthma
  • Pica (this is when they try eating non-edible things)
  • Hip Dysplasia

During this visit, your kitten will receive her first immunizations. According to Found Animals, your kitten will be given important vaccinations to keep her healthy. Your Siamese will go in for regular check-ups and booster shots annually or semi-annually after the 1st year.

Taking Your Siamese Kitten Home

Soon the Siamese kitten will be placed in her forever home. The recommendations for when a kitten can be taken from its mother vary anywhere from 6 weeks to 14 weeks. However, many breeders will not release the kittens to their new home until they are at least ten weeks old.

It is healthier for the kitten to remain with her mother for these extra weeks. During this time, the mother cat is teaching the kittens how to be cats and how to live with people. Though the kittens are mostly weaned, they may still nurse, giving them nutrients that only the mother’s milk can give.

Siamese Kitten Growth: 4 to 6 Months Old

At this point, the Siamese kitten should be with her new family. She will be adapting to life independent of her mother and siblings. Be patient with this new member of your family. She will learn, you will all learn; how to get along with each other.

By six months old, your Siamese Kitten will look very adult. If you have not had your kitten spayed or neutered, this is when they come into sexual maturity, and the female will have her first heat.

Just because they have reached sexual maturity does not mean they are fully grown. They will continue to grow a little in height and size over the next year and a half. During the second year, growth has slowed to the point of almost being un-noticeable.

The Adult Siamese Cat

The adult Siamese will have stopped growing physically, but they are continuously learning. For the first two years of life, your Siamese will probably still exhibit many kittenish qualities and energy. As your cat ages, she will begin to mellow.

The Siamese cat is considered a medium-sized breed. They have sleek bodies with slender legs and typically weigh 8 to 10 pounds for females and 10 to 15 pounds for males. Their heads are triangular with a pronounced chin, and they are often referred to as apple heads.

Siamese cats often live for 15 to 20 years, though some live much longer. Because they are so intelligent, they are known to learn to open cabinets and some doors. This can make it difficult to keep them out of food, yours and theirs.

Weight gain can be an issue with the Siamese, especially as they age. They love food and will beg like a dog for human treats. Of course, we want to give them treats but try to keep them active and limit the adult cat’s food to maintain a healthy weight.

Speaking of food with cats, sometimes cat owners will provide cat grass to their cats as a supplement.  To learn more about cat grass, check out our article: Click Here.

Are Siamese Cats More Intelligent?

The Siamese cat will continue to grow in intelligence throughout her lifetime.

Are Siamese cats more intelligent than other cats? Observed evidence from cat owners makes us think Siamese cats are highly intelligent.  

Why is My Siamese Cat Vocal?

The Siamese cat is very vocal, especially with people. They have different meows for different things and will chatter up a storm if they think you’re listening. If you pay attention to your cat’s meows, you will be able to decipher much of what they say.

  • Happy to see you
  • I’m hungry
  • I’m bored
  • I’m mad
  • I want in / out

One of the ways that Siamese cats are vocal is by yowling.  To learn more about why a Siamese cat yowls, check out our article: Click Here.

Siamese Cats Are Smart

Just as our Siamese cat tries to communicate with us vocally, they also attempt to figure out our world. Your cat is always watching you. It is through this observation that they begin learning how things work.

Siamese cat parents often talk about their cat opening cabinets and other doors. How did they learn that? They watch you. They may attempt to mimic your actions, for example, turning a doorknob to open a door.

How to Play with Siamese Cats

As kittens, they learn through play and observation. They require your attention and demand your time. Begin introducing stimulating toys while your kitten is young. The Siamese cat is extremely intelligent and needs the stimulation of play as well as your interaction.

  • A cat tree (Amazon affiliate link) will give your cat years of enjoyment. It is important to give your kitty a place to sharpen their claws and learn to climb. 
  • A cat tunnel and small toys (Amazon affiliate link) will also help your kitten stay active and learn through play.

If you do not have tons of money to keep your kitty busy, don’t worry. You can make your own toys with things you already have, such as:

  • Cardboard boxes for them to play and hide in
  • A stick with ribbon or material tied to it
  • Small stuffed animals also work nicely
  • Put some bells in a plastic jar (make sure they cannot get the lid off) and let them roll it around
Siamese Cat

Training Your Siamese Cat

Some things will make life easier with your Siamese cat if put into practice early.

Introduce and use a pet carrier when your kitten comes home. Supply food, water, and warm bedding in the carrier. Keep the carrier open for your Siamese to come and go at will. If your cat is comfortable with the pet carrier, it will be easy to get them in it for those vet visits!

Siamese can be leash trained. Introduce collars and harnesses when your kitten is very young. As they become used to the collar or harness, introduce the leash. Clip the leash onto their harness and allow them to wander around with it for a while with you close to them. After some time, hold the leash as you follow them around.

To dive deeper on whether cat harnesses are cruel to use on cats, check out our article: Click Here.

Once you are both comfortable inside, you can take your cat outdoors. Stay close to the house initially. Take your cat indoors immediately if he seems stressed or frightened. Our latest addition now asks to go outside by grabbing his leash and meowing at the door.

Conclusion

Video: Siamese Kittens!

Your Siamese cat will grow, physically and mentally. She will require your companionship and attention throughout her life. Through the years, you will discover that your Siamese cat has many things to teach you too.

If you enjoyed reading about Siamese cats, check out two of our head-to-head analysis articles featuring Siamese cats vs another breed of cat:

  • Maine Coon vs Siamese (See The Epic Full Analysis): Click Here.
  • Devon Rex vs Siamese (Which Feline Is The Best?): Click Here.

Here are some of my favorite cat products

In addition to checking out some other More Meows articles, I hope you’ll check out some of my favorite cat products as well.  These are affiliate links, so if you end up using them, I’ll get a commission at no extra cost to you.  These are the products I really do find most helpful.

Litter Box:  I started out with normal, traditional litter boxes for my cat.  Then, I tried this automatic litter box on Amazon (affiliate link), which helped reduce the litter upkeep.  Finally, I am now a believer in the Litter-Robot 3 Connect on Amazon (affiliate link).  This robotic litter box is not for everyone based on the price tag, but for me the benefits (very little upkeep, works efficiently, clean, mobile app) far outweighed the cost. 

My Cat’s Litter-Robot 3 Connect (with night light on) – See the link above the photo!

Cat Tree:  I have purchased a couple of this Amazon Basics Cat Tree on Amazon (affiliate link).  My cat spends a lot of time on and around this cat tree, which I position near my sofa.  She uses the scratching posts on this cat tree multiple times a day, which means she is not scratching the sofa instead.

Cat Water Fountain:  I love this cat water fountain on Amazon (affiliate link).  There are three main benefits to having a water fountain like this for your cat.  The first benefit is that it keeps water running so that my cat doesn’t need to drink still water.  The second benefit is that it filters the water.  The third benefit is that my cat uses it – keeping my cat hydrated is important.

Christopher Carlson

I have an Domestic Shorthair Tabby named Charlotte. She is full of energy when she isn't sleeping most of the day. I share what I learn about cats on this site.

Recent Posts